Thursday, August 9, 2012

A D I S I L

http://www.guardian.co.uk/discussion/user-comments/bhartisvaraj

Millet nutrition

Millet nutrition - 1 cup cooked millet
Calories
286
     Carbohydrate (g)
57
Total fat (g)
2.4
     Cholesterol (mg)
0
Saturated fat (g)
0.4
     Sodium (mg)
5
Monounsaturated fat (g)
0.4
     Thiamine (mg)
0.3
Polyunsaturated fat (g)
1.2
     Niacin (mg)
3.2
Dietary fiber (g)
3.1
     Magnesium (mg)
106
Protein (g)
8
     Zinc (mg)
2.2

TABLE 17: Nutrient composition of sorghum, millets and other cereals (per 100 g edible portion; 12 percent moisture)
Food
Proteina (g)
Fat (g)
Ash (g)
Crude fibre (g)
Carbohydrate (g)
Energy (kcal)
Ca (mg)
Fe (mg)
Thiamin (mg)
Riboflavin (mg)
Niacin (mg)
Rice (brown)
7.9
2.7
1.3
1.0
76.0
362
33
1.8
0.41
0.04
4.3
Wheat
11.6
2.0
1.6
2.0
71.0
348
30
3.5
0.41
0.10
5.1
Maize
(M.cholam)
9.2
4.6
1.2
2.8
73.0
358
26
2.7
0.38
0.20
3.6
Sorghum
(Cholam)
10.4
3.1
1.6
2.0
70.7
329
25
5.4
0.38
0.15
4.3
Pearl millet
11.8
4.8
2.2
2.3
67.0
363
42
11.0
0.38
0.21
2.8
Finger millet
(Keppai)
7.7
1.5
2.6
3.6
72.6
336
350
3.9
0.42
0.19
1.1
Foxtail millet/Italian
(thinai)
11.2
4.0
3.3
6.7
63.2
351
31
2.8
0.59
0.11
3.2
Common millet
(Panivaragu/Kadikanni)
12.5
3.5
3.1
5.2
63.8
364
8
2.9
0.41
0.28
4.5
Little millet
(Samai)
9.7
5.2
5.4
7.6
60.9
329
17
9.3
0.30
0.09
3.2
Barnyard millet
(Kuduraivali)
11.0
3.9
4.5
13.6
55.0
300
22
18.6
0.33
0.10
4.2
Kodo millet
(Varagu)
9.8
3.6
3.3
5.2
66.6
353
35
1.7
0.15
0.09
2.0
N x 6.25.
Sources: Hulse. Laing and Pearson. 1980: United States National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. 1982. USDA/HNIS. 1984.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Natural Dye

Natural dyeing has been an age old tradition in India, recent invention of chemical dyes and their excessive usage has caused health related problems. The vegetable dyed and printed fabrics adorned homes not only in India but to the homes of western world also. The people who are conscious to the environment have been searching for alternatives to synthetic dyes. This has led to the reinvention of natural dyes.

Natural dyes are obtained from renewable resources and the usage of these dyes contributes the conservation of the nature. As the pigment content in these dyes is very low, lot of source material is required. Natural dyes are not marketed in large quantities as these dyes are consumed only by few specified groups. Lot of varieties that give rise to good colours are present in the forests and other waste lands. Collection of these dyes will not only provide livelihood to rural people but also make the dye ready for promoting value chain in natural dyes.

Sl.

Latin Name

Common Name

Parts Used

Color Obtain

Indian Name

1.

Acacia Arabica

Babla

Bark

Brown

Babul

2.

Acacia Catechu

Cutch

Wood, Bark

Yellow, Brown, Black

Khair, Katha

3.

Acacia Sinuate

-

Bark, Leaves

Light Brown

Shikakai, Reetha

4.

Archis Hypogea

Groundnut Kernel Skins

-

Purple, Brown, Pink

Mungfali, Sing

5.

Areca Catechu

Betel Nut, Nut

-

Deep Pink Brown

Suprari

6.

Calendual Spp

Marigold

Whole Plant, Flower Heads

Yellow

Genda

7.

Curcuma Longa

Turmeric

Roots, Barks, Stems

Yellow

Haldi

8.

Emblica Officinalis

Indian Gooseberry

Leaves, Fruits

Yellow, Brown, Grey, Black

Amla

9.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus

Leaves

Deep Gold, Grey

Nilgiri

10.

Gossypium Herbaceum

Cotton

Bark, Hull

Yellow

Kapas

11.

Indigofera Tinctoria

Indigo

Leaves

Blue

Neel

12.

Jatrpha Curcas

Physic Nut, Wild Castor

Leaves Seeds

Yellow, Green, Khakhi Brown, Black

Wild Erandel

13.

Mangifera Indica

Mango

Bark

Yellow

Aam

14.

Morinda Citrifolia

Indian Mulbery

Roots

Red, Brown

Ashi Ach

15.

Moringa Pterygosperma

Drumstick

Leaves

Yellow, Orange

Sanjana, Shenga

16.

Punica Granatum

Pomegranate

Whole Plant

Brown

Anar, Dadari

17.

Rubia Cordifolia

Indian Madder

Whole Plant

Orange, Red

Manjista Manjith

18.

Tectona Grandis

Teak

Bark, Leaves

Yellow

Sagun, Sagwan

19.

Terminalia Bellirica

Belerie Myrobalan

Fruits, Leaves

Yellow, Brown

Bahera

20.

Terminalia Chebula

Myrobalan

Fruits, Leaves

Yellow, Black

Harad, Hirad

21.

Zingiber Officinale

Ginger

Rhizome

Brilliant Yellow

Adhrak, Adhu

22.

Ziziphus Mauritiana

Indian Jujube

Bark, Fruits

Red

Ber, Bor, Bora


ADISIL team make following shades,





Thursday, November 4, 2010

CONTACT

ADISIL
15/B Pioneer Colony
Tirumangalam, Madurai - 625706
email: adisilmail@gmail.com
phone: 098420 48317

Saturday, September 11, 2010

ORGANIC COTTON









We can supply 
Organic cotton
Organic cotton yarn
Organic cotton fabric
and 
Organic cotton garments 

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

CONVENTION


Convention on FARMER RIGHTS IN TAMIL NADU, INDIA

India is one of the agriculture-based counties in the world. Near about 70% of the people are depending upon farming in Tamil Nadu, India. After Independence Indian policy makers were consecrating on agriculture and food security of the wider section of people. In 1990 the new economic paradigm set up for the entry of globalisation. The FDI driven globalisation model of development being pursued is predatory in nature and has severely damaged the farming community in Tamil Nadu. Small and marginal farmers are facing extinction and majority of them are willing to abandon farming if they have an option. First time in the Indian history the tragedy of mass suicides among the farming community are spreading all over India.

Farmers and farming are critical for the simple reason that without the food farmers produce people cannot live. Food is clubbed with water and air for human existence. Of these only food is produced, and this is what farmers do. Producing adequate food within the country is at the core of food security and this cannot be compromised at any cost. Food is not the only product of farming. Farms produce a whole range of products that are critical for human well-being, industrial development and employment generation. Besides it gives livelihood to vast majority of population.

After globalisation severe onslaught of Multi Nationals, moneybags and speculators acquiring tens of thousands of acres of agricultural land for exotic purposes like SEZ, Satellite cities, IT Townships, MNC industries and luxury real estate projects. Land Ceiling laws are being blatantly violated with full support and even involvement of State Government

In addition to water conflicts, which are already raging, SEZs and MNCs have triggered land wars. This is just the tip of the iceberg and worse would follow if immediate steps were not taken to counter this reckless ravaging of land that deprives livelihood for the masses while transplanting an unsustainable jobless development model.

After the introduction of Green Revolution farmers were lose their self-reliance of seed, manure, technology and market. But the new gene revolution is pushing the entire farming community out of the field and the food safety of the public is also questioned.

India’s current agri-crisis is rooted in the so-called green revolution farming practice and policies of the last 30 years which has resulted not only in the deterioration of our land and water but also shifted the power gradually from public to private domain, from governments to MNCs, the new influencing agents of political and economic policies of the third world.

A rally was organised by Thaalaanmai Farmers Movement and more than 15 NGOs in the month of December 2007.

The convention started on 28th December 2007 morning 10.00 O’clock.

Near about 2000 farmers were assembled in the convention. Eminent leaders, Government authorities and Activists had participated in the convention. Series of resolution passed in the convention.

Dr. Devinder Sharma – Agriculture policy analyst, Dr. Naryana Reddy – well-kown organic farmer, Ms. Barthi Patel- Svaraj, Mr. S.N. Nagarajan – Scientist, Mr. Chandrasekar – Spices Board, Dr. Jeevanandam – Green Movement, Er. Venkatachalam, Er. Balakrishnan and others had given valuable presentations.

District wise presentation had provided in the convention by fifteen district convenors of Thaalaanmai Farmers Movement.

Saturday, July 24, 2010

Sundararaman - Organic Farmer and Trainer


The problem of degraded soils, insects and weeds

Degraded soils are a major problem in many developing countries and the Bangalore conference heard practising experts explain how organic techniques can be employed for restoration.

Claude Alvares

Facing insects, disease and weeds

One major problem facing all farmers, organic or conventional, is the appearance of troublesome insects, weeds and plant disease. SR Sundararaman, a highly respected and knowledgeable organic farmer from Tamil Nadu, made the main presentation on techniques farmers can use to solve most of their plant disease problems and any difficulties with insects.

The interesting thing about Sundararaman is that he not only functions as a knowledge centre, but his knowledge and expertise keep growing. Universities find it hard to keep up with him. Having been a chemical farmer two decades ago, he knows what he went through and why chemical methods failed.

Sundararaman has worked with interested colleagues and engineers to create microorganism-enriched mixtures (which he calls MEM) for the control of soil-borne diseases, nematodes and root grubs. He also has a large number of recipes made from leaf extracts, buttermilk, waste fish and egg extracts, panchagavya and some unique other solutions which he calls 'fruit gaudi' and 'archae'. While some of these are bacterial preparations, others deal effectively with unwelcome visitors to his soils, including grubs. All his recipes and techniques today are freely available to other farmers.

Sundararaman was followed by Joseph John, another organic farmer, who presented a wide range of non-chemical-based bioremedies for plant illness and disease.

On behalf of herself, her husband Dr Anurag Goel and their daughter Maya (a family of organic farmers from Coorg), Sujata Goel shared 10 years of rich insights on their organic farm which grows largely coffee and spices. Goel told her attentive audience that plants have their own natural defence mechanisms and it is far more effective to work in tandem with the plant's own defence strategy than to attempt to bypass it with deadly chemicals. Unless we understand these natural defence mechanisms, she said, we would continue to make costly and unnecessary mistakes. Using deadly sprays of chemical poisons not only suppressed these defence mechanisms, they ruined the product as well since pesticide residues are bound to remain after the harvest as most pesticides are non-biodegradable. The Goels are trained microbiologists and lab technicians who deserted Delhi to move to Coorg in south India where they took over an existing spice farm and turned it completely organic over a 10-year period.

*Third World Network No. 230, October 2009, pp 18-19